We Don't Need To Whisper

Jul 30

quote

It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the black and Hispanic and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.

— comment left on the Racialious blog post “Sustainable Food & Priviledge: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)

Haven’t been active in a while but this is worth mentioning.

(Source: ominykaress)

Jul 06
Jun 08

cadenced:

Gee Atherton attempts to outwit a Peregrine Falcon in this video from Red Bull.

Jun 03
May 08
laboratoryequipment:

Beer Waste Will Power Alaskan BreweryThe Alaskan Brewing Co. is going green, but instead of looking to solar and wind energy, it has turned to a very familiar source: beer.The Juneau-based beer maker has installed a unique boiler system in order to cut its fuel costs. It purchased a $1.8 million furnace that burns the company’s spent grain — the waste accumulated from the brewing process — into steam which powers the majority of the brewery’s operations. Company officials now joke they are now serving “beer-powered beer.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/beer-waste-will-power-alaskan-brewery

This is great. Way to go Alaska!

laboratoryequipment:

Beer Waste Will Power Alaskan Brewery

The Alaskan Brewing Co. is going green, but instead of looking to solar and wind energy, it has turned to a very familiar source: beer.

The Juneau-based beer maker has installed a unique boiler system in order to cut its fuel costs. It purchased a $1.8 million furnace that burns the company’s spent grain — the waste accumulated from the brewing process — into steam which powers the majority of the brewery’s operations. Company officials now joke they are now serving “beer-powered beer.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/beer-waste-will-power-alaskan-brewery

This is great. Way to go Alaska!

May 07

stephnrice:

glassmountain:

stfuconservatives:

nextyearsgirl:

This is an enormous chain and I’m sorry, but I need to say this:

The laws in the Old Testament were set forth by god as the rules the Hebrews needed to follow in order to be righteous, to atone for the sin of Adam and Eve and to be able to get into Heaven. That is also why they were required to make sacrifices, because it was part of the appeasement for Original Sin.

According to Christian theology, when Jesus came from Heaven, it was for the express purpose of sacrificing himself on the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. His sacrifice was supposed to be the ultimate act that would free us from the former laws and regulations and allow us to enter Heaven by acting in his image. That is why he said “it is finished” when he died on the cross. That is why Christians don’t have to circumcise their sons (god’s covenant with Jacob), that is why they don’t have to perform animal sacrifice, or grow out their forelocks, or follow any of the other laws of Leviticus.

When you quote Leviticus as god’s law and say they are rules we must follow because they are what god or Jesus wants us to do, what you are really saying, as a Christian, is that Christ’s sacrifice on the cross was invalid. He died in vain because you believe we are still beholden to the old laws. That is what you, a self-professed good Christian, are saying to your god and his son, that their plan for your salvation wasn’t good enough for you.

So maybe actually read the thing before you start quoting it, because the implications of your actions go a lot deeper than you think.

/An atheist who understands Christian theology better than Bible-thumpers do.

^

(mic drop)

boom

whoa.

(Source: drunkonstephen)

May 01

POZ Decade: Fall Out Boy - Take This To Your Grave

propertyofzack:

image

Today PropertyOfZack is launching our sixth Decade feature in honor Fall Out Boy’s Take This To Your Grave, which will be celebrating its ten year anniversary next week. Though the band has confirmed that we will not be getting a ten year tour for their debut full-length album, there’s no reason we can’t look back on the record together. We have commentary on the album via team members Deanna Chapman, Michael Sheffey, Adrienne Fisher, and Brittany Oblak. Enjoy and reblog to let us know your thoughts on Take This To Your Grave ten years later! 

How did Take This To Your Grave change FOB’s future
Take This To Your Grave was the first full-length album Fall Out Boy recorded in the studio. This album created a significant fan base for them and then they began to tour, playing in small venues. They had been the opening act for bands such as Yellowcard, Taking Back Sunday, and blink-182. Performing with bands like that, how could Fall Out Boy not gain some recognition? Although the album didn’t make the Billboard charts when it first came out, it definitely had a positive impact on the band’s future. A media buzz surrounded the album and TV stations such as FUSE and mtvU began airing their videos for “Saturday” and “Grand Theft Autumn/Where Is Your Boy.” That exposure gave them the recognition they needed to be picked up for their next album, From Under The Cork Tree. TTTYG proved that Stump and Wentz were capable of writing great songs and catching people’s attention. For this being their first full-length effort, the band started with high standards. The album ultimately launched the band forward and allowed them to continue with their music career. – Deanna Chapman 

Most important song on Take This To Your Grave
There’s no doubt that TTTYG is hailed as one of the albums, if not the album, that made Fall Out Boy. And as far as important song goes, there are two obvious contenders: The quintessential pop-punk anthem “Saturday,” with Stump’s pensive vocal reflection (written by Wentz) on potential thrills in a standstill life and Wentz’s belting screams that project a sense of urgency and chaos; and the catchy, if less heavy, “Grand Theft Autumn/Where Is Your Boy” with an a cappella intro that grabs the audience from the start and keeps them chanting throughout. Despite my longing for pop-punk heritage, the clear winner has to be “Grand Theft Autumn.” This song and video put Fall Out Boy on the track to stardom and was on FUSE and Target’s in-store video/radio broadcasts all across the country in a matter of months.  It’s more catchy and poppy feel grabbed anyone from show-going fanboys to random radio listeners shopping for groceries. Though the success of this song was not truly felt until the album’s follow up, From Under The Cork Tree,which surged TTTYG sales dramatically, it’s clear that “Grand Theft Autumn” was the audience frontrunner. Everyone and their mother knows and loves this song. – Mike Sheffey

Fall Out Boy follow up to Take This To Your Grave 
We’re all pretty familiar with the trajectory of Fall Out Boy’s career - rocketeering mainstream success, some interesting stylistic departures, inevitable fame-weary hiatus, and the recent resurrection marked by the glory-hallelujahs of fans all over the world. But following immediately the release of Take This to Your Grave was the underground takeover of the pop-punk scene of the early 2000s, one that at the time was largely dominated by the sterling roster of Drive-Thru Records darlings. FOB followed up its soon-to-be-beloved full-length with relentless touring, supporting bands like Mest and Less Than Jake before amping up enough momentum to start headlining the clubs themselves.

By then, those guitar swings that Pete and Joe had been perfecting at every show had become nothing short of their trademark. In May 2004, they released an often-overlooked acoustic EP titled (deep breath) My Heart Will Always Be the B-Side To My Tongue, featuring some gouging emo acoustic tunes. Included was an unplugged “Grand Theft Autumn,” one very uncomfortable Joy Division cover, and most notably, the demo version of “Nobody Puts Baby In The Corner,” which was the world’s first glimpse into what was to come in From Under the Cork Tree. In the year to follow, the full-band version of that song appeared on Purevolume, “Sugar, We’re Going Down” materialized onto Top 40 radio airwaves everywhere, Pete Wentz survived a suicide attempt and miraculously FUTCTemerged to the world, courtesy of major label Island Records.

Read More

Will never forget seeing FOB back in ‘04. This is one of those albums that will always get a reblog.

Feb 27
tastefullyoffensive:

[safelyendangered]


Love this
Feb 07
wincherella:

thinkingininklings:

Stephen Fry’s take on the e-reader vs. book argument.

Laughed out loud at this. Perfect!

wincherella:

thinkingininklings:

Stephen Fry’s take on the e-reader vs. book argument.

Laughed out loud at this. Perfect!

Jan 30

sportads:

own the moment. via @BauerHockey